Women in Trump Administration: Are they just their looks?

Last week, Sean Spicer had abruptly resigned from his position as the White House press secretary due his disagreement with the appointment of New York financier Anthony Scaramucci as the new communications director. His claim was that hiring Scaramucci would strengthen the uncertainty the public already has towards the White House. After his resignation, Spicer’s top deputy Sarah Huckabee has been promoted to serve as the press secretary for the White House.

Since then, freshly appointed Scaramucci has already made his first blunder. In his appearance in CNN’s State of the Union, Scaramucci said “I think Sarah does a great job. She’s an incredibly warm person, she’s incredibly authentic.” He added “For Sarah Huckabee, I want to do everything I can to make her better at that podium. I think she’s phenomenal there now. But like every athlete that is training for the Olympics, every day we have to make ourselves incrementally better.”

And his what he think needs improvement? Huckabee’s hair and makeup. “The only thing I ask Sarah—Sarah, if you’re watching, I loved the hair and makeup person we had on Friday, so I’d like to continue to use the hair and makeup person.”

Scaramucci answered the backlash by claiming he was referring to his own hair and makeup. However, that hardly improves the situation since it suggests that Huckabee should focus on Scaramucci’s hair and makeup to improve her own career as a White House press secretary.

And this is not the first time that female politicians under the Trump administration has been minimized to their looks. Earlier it has also been claimed that Trump wants her female employees to be “dressed like women”. The claims were responded by many Twitter users with the hashtag #dresslikeawoman, rejecting the idea of the current government that women are merely their looks.

By |2018-02-03T00:01:37+00:00July 25th, 2017|

About the Author:

Aslı Bildirici is a freelance producer currently working and studying in The Netherlands. She has worked in several companies and cultural projects that value creativity and social impact.

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